Journal cover Journal topic
Earth Surface Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.000 IF 2.000
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 2.000 IF 5-year
    2.000
  • CiteScore<br/> value: 1.84 CiteScore
    1.84
  • SNIP value: 0.628 SNIP 0.628
  • SJR value: indexed SJR
    indexed
  • IPP value: 1.689 IPP 1.689
  • h5-index value: 6 h5-index 6
Earth Surf. Dynam., 5, 187-198, 2017
http://www.earth-surf-dynam.net/5/187/2017/
doi:10.5194/esurf-5-187-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
22 Mar 2017
Laboratory rivers: Lacey's law, threshold theory, and channel stability
François Métivier et al.
Download
Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Review of "Laboratory rivers: Lacey’s law, threshold theory and channel stability", by Metiver et al.', Douglas Jerolmack, 29 Sep 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Answers to Professor Jerolmack', Francois METIVIER, 27 Feb 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'esurf-2016-47 Review', Daniel Parsons, 29 Nov 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Answers to Professor Parsons', Francois METIVIER, 27 Feb 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Pr. Francois METIVIER on behalf of the Authors (27 Feb 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (01 Mar 2017) by Prof Andreas Lang
ED: Publish as is (02 Mar 2017) by Prof. Tom Coulthard (Editor)  
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
More than a century of experiments have demonstrated that many features of natural rivers can be reproduced in the laboratory. Here, we revisit some of these experiments to show that, regardless of the river's planform (single-thread or braiding), laboratory rivers behave like their natural counterparts. We further suggest that sediment transport could be responsible for the transition into a braided river, which could, in turn, explain the scarcity of laboratory single-thread channels.
More than a century of experiments have demonstrated that many features of natural rivers can be...
Share