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Earth Surface Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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Earth Surf. Dynam., 5, 269-281, 2017
http://www.earth-surf-dynam.net/5/269/2017/
doi:10.5194/esurf-5-269-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
17 May 2017
Physical theory for near-bed turbulent particle suspension capacity
Joris T. Eggenhuisen et al.
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Physical theory for near-bed turbulent particle-suspension capacity', Anonymous Referee #1, 11 Oct 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'short comment as a preliminary response to referee 1', Jorris Eggenhuisen, 14 Oct 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
 
SC1: 'on the use of clear-water turbulence characteristics in the suspension criterion's force balance', Mike Tilston, 17 Oct 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
 
RC2: 'J.T. Eggenhuisen, M.J.B. Cartigny and J de Leeuw, Physical theory for near-bed turbulent particle-suspension capacity', Anonymous Referee #2, 04 Jan 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jorris Eggenhuisen on behalf of the Authors (07 Mar 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by Editor) (14 Mar 2017) by Daniel Parsons  
AR by Jorris Eggenhuisen on behalf of the Authors (07 Apr 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (10 Apr 2017) by Daniel Parsons  
ED: Publish as is (10 Apr 2017) by Tom Coulthard (Editor)  
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Suspension of particles in turbulent flows is one of the most widely occurring physical phenomena in nature, yet no theory predicts the sediment transport capacity of the wind, avalanches, pyroclastic flows, rivers, and estuarine or marine currents. We derive such a theory from universal turbulence characteristics and fluid and particle properties alone. It compares favourably with measurements and previous empiric formulations, making it the first process-based theory for particle suspension.
Suspension of particles in turbulent flows is one of the most widely occurring physical...
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