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Earth Surface Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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ESurf | Articles | Volume 7, issue 1
Earth Surf. Dynam., 7, 199–210, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-7-199-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Earth Surf. Dynam., 7, 199–210, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-7-199-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 13 Feb 2019

Research article | 13 Feb 2019

Reconstruction of four-dimensional rockfall trajectories using remote sensing and rock-based accelerometers and gyroscopes

Andrin Caviezel et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (03 Dec 2018)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (30 Jan 2019) by Michael Krautblatter
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (31 Jan 2019) by Niels Hovius(Editor)
AR by Andrin Caviezel on behalf of the Authors (06 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
In rockfall hazard assessment, knowledge about the precise flight path of assumed boulders is vital for its accuracy. We present the full reconstruction of artificially induced rockfall events. The extracted information such as exact velocities, jump heights and lengths provide detailed insights into how rotating rocks interact with the ground. The information serves as future calibration of rockfall modelling tools with the goal of even more realistic modelling predictions.
In rockfall hazard assessment, knowledge about the precise flight path of assumed boulders is...
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